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How To Configure VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service On vSphere 6.7

I hope you already know VMware Software Defined Storage Solution, vSAN is a leading solution for its enterprise customers and it comes with the vSAN iSCSI Target Service to access the vSAN datastore from the outside vSAN Cluster. This VMware vSAN iSCSI target service can be used to provide the additional storage to the other servers to facilitate the storage requirements. The configuration is quite simple and straight forward and I decided to publish this article to show the complete step-by-step guide to provision storage using this iSCSI Target Service from VMware vSAN.

Adding iSCSI Target And LUN

To start the Configuration, select the vSAN Cluster and go to the “Configure” tab. Select the “iSCSI Target Service” and click on “Enable“. If you can’t see the iSCSI Target service and see some error with the versions try this which describes in my previous article.

Enable VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Toggle the option to enable the service in the cluster, by default this service is not enabled

Toggle VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Once you enable the service, select the default iSCSI target network vmkernel adapter, default port and the authentication mechanism at the time of writing this article VMware vSAN supports CHAP and Mutual CHAP authentication methods

Default network VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Select the Storage Policy for the vSAN Home Objects, this can be created separately and the policy will be listed in the drop down menu

Set Storage Policy VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Check the recent task list of the service enablement and wait until it completes the running tasks

Check status VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Once the service successfully enabled click on “Add” to add the targets

Add targets VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Provide the details such as IQN (I usually select the system generated IQN), Alias, vSAN Storage Policy specific to the iSCSI Target, vmkernel, TCP Port and Authentication

New Target config VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Created iSCSI Target will be listed and iSCSI LUN should be created after that, to do that click on “Add” under the created target

Create LUN VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Provide the LUN details such as LUN ID, Alias, Storage Policy and Size, click “Add” to complete the LUN addition

Add LUN VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

Created LUN will visible as below once it confirmed, Make a note of the “I/O Owner Host” before we move in to the next step

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service LUN Created
Note the I/O Owner Host

Add iSCSI LUN To The Windows Operating System

After successfully creating the iSCSI Target and LUN, it can be mounted to other devices to provide the storage requirements. Here, let’s see how we can configure the Windows Operating system to map the LUN as a Hard Drive.

Search “iSCSI Initiator” in the Start Menu

Add Initiator VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

In the “Target:” text box type the “I/O Owner Host” address which noted in the previous step and click on “Quick Connect…

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service Target Node

Once the connection successful, you can see the login status as “Connected“, click “Done

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service Click done

Connection status will show as connected, if everything is configured properly

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service Successfully configured

Perform the disk initialization process in the Operating System in the Server Manager under Disks Management console

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service Complete Disk Management

Once the disk configuration is done disk will be visible in the Explorer

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service Added Disk

Remove VMware vSAN iSCSI Target LUN

To Remove the iSCSI Target LUN Select LUN under iSCSI Target Service and click on “Remove

VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service Remove LUN

Click on “Remove

click remove VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

To remove the iSCSI Target Click on “Remove” in the vSAN iSCSI Target

Remove Target VMware vSAN iSCSI Target Service

These are the basic operations for the VMware vSAN iSCSI Target configurations, I hope this post is useful for the similar configurations in a vSAN configured environment.

Aruna Lakmal

Associate Technical Specialist at Pearson, Sri Lanka. Technology junky, enthusiast, a VMware vExpert and a blogger with more than 7 years of Experience in Information Technology more focusing on VMware Virtualization, Microsoft and Datacenter Technologies.

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